Risk Bulletins

Risk Bulletins allows Maritime Mutual members to keep informed about changes that impact on Maritime Insurance. Keeping up-to-date provides our members with greater opportunity to understand their obligations and minimise risk situations.

Maritime Mutual Risk Bulletin No. 21 - Lifeboat / Davits Maintenance

Lifeboats and Davits: Maintenance by ‘Authorised Service Providers’ Only!

New and important IMO/SOLAS requirements for the maintenance, examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats by ‘authorised service providers, entered into force on 1 January 2020. This Risk Bulletin is focused on assisting MM members, their ship managers and masters to accomplish this obligation and further reduce lifeboat accident risk exposure.

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Black Smoke From Ship Funnel

The MARPOL 2020 ‘Global Sulphur Cap’ and ‘No Transition Period’ Compliance – Are You Ready?

MM’s Risk Bulletin No.7 (Feb 2019) alerted members to the urgent necessity to ensure full compliance with the IMO’s MEPC.1/Circ.878 requiring the regarding the urgent preparation of a MARPOL 2020 Ship Implementation Plan (SIP) . This Risk Bulletin No 19 is intended to remind all MM members, their ship managers, masters and chief engineers that strict compliance with MARPOL 2020 will be globally initiated and enforced on 1 Jan 2020.

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Persian Gulf/Strait of Hormuz/Gulf of Oman Map

Strait of Hormuz Security Update: MARAD, BIMCO and ‘Operation Sentinel’

Further to MM’s recent Risk Bulletin advice to members on shipboard security in the Persian Gulf/Strait of Hormuz/Gulf of Oman, the situation in that region has unfortunately intensified. The focus of this MM Risk Bulletin is to raise member awareness of the MARAD advisories and the BIMCO Guidance, together with the importance of ensuring that all recommended reporting and security procedures are adhered to.

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Automatic Identification System

Automatic Identification System (AIS) – ‘cloaking’ and consequences

Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders were originally designed as anti-collision devices which transmit and exchange a ship’s name, position, course, speed and other situational data with other ships and shore stations in the area. Now transformed by technology advances, AIS ship identity and position data may be accessed on the internet by any member of the public for both legitimate and illegitimate purposes.

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Oil Tanker on Fire

Gulf of Oman ‘Tanker Wars’ and BMP5 Guidelines

As has been widely reported, missile and limp mine attacks took place on two large crude oil tankers navigating at the western end of the Gulf of Oman on 13 June 2019. The purpose of this Risk Bulletin is to ensure that MM members – regardless of the flag their ships fly – are fully aware of the significant dangers now posed to shipping in the Persian Gulf, the Straits of Hormuz and the NW sector of the Gulf of Oman.

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Seaman AB or Bosun on deck of offshore vessel or ship , wearing PPE personal protective equipment - helmet, coverall, lifejacket, goggles.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): the final safety barrier

Ships are large, heavy duty sea transport machines. They are known to be hazardous places in which to both work and live. In such an environment, the provision and habitual use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is essential. Regrettably, the feedback from P&I and other surveyors is that PPE is often not being used properly or consistently by ships’ crews.

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Liferaft Secured

Life Raft Hydrostatic Release Units (HRUs): properly fitted and functioning?

One of the main benefits of liferafts is that even if the seas are too rough to launch a ship’s lifeboats or a ship is listed too heavily for its lifeboat davits to function, the crew will still be provided with a means of escaping a sinking vessel. The other very positive feature is that a liferaft fitted with a Hydrostatic Release Unit (HRU) will automatically release, float free and inflate even if a ship should suddenly break up or capsize.

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